DOTA 2’s the International 2016 to have the Highest Prize Pool in Esports History

Like every year, DOTA 2’s biggest esports event of the year, the International 2016 is here. This time, continuing the trend of the past years, the International will have the highest prize pool in esports of more than $20 million.

The International 2016 makes use of money from the compendium. The Compendium is a little package for players to enjoy the tournament, make predictions, and get treasures. It costs $10, and 25% of each purchase directly goes to the prize pool of this tournament. Due to this, all the past Internationals have always had high prize pools.

Last year’s prize pool reached $18 million. This year, it’s going to be even more than that as the marker has hit $20 million today. This is a huge number. For comparison, the Cricket World Cup’s prize money is $10 million, Super Bowl winners get $8 million and last year’s Tour de France had a pool of $2.2 million with the winner’s share being almost $500,000.

The International 2016 is the sixth iteration of Valve’s annual DOTA 2 world tournament, where top-tier teams from all over the world come together to battle for the right to be called the best team in the world, and yes to claim the insane prize money. For the third time, the main event will take place at Key Arena in Seattle, which has a seating capacity of 17,000 viewers. Valve introduced Majors last year, which are basically seasonal tournaments. People expected the International 2016 to not have such a high prize pool because of the money distribution, but that hasn’t been a problem so far.

Many talented players from all over the world are competing in the tournament. Last year’s champions Evil Geniuses are in the Main Event, so are the champions from the year before, Newbee. All Chinese teams that are taking part in the tournament seem to have come with all guns blazing.

The winner of the grand finals will win approximately $9 million. It is surprising to note that the team in 4th place will get about $1.5 million, which is more than the total prize pool of the first International.