The End Is Nigh for Wii U, Production Wraps Up Soon

Nintendo could possibly be ending global production for Wii U this week, if a new report is to be believed.

Multiple sources close to the matter have informed Eurogamer that Nintendo marked October 31 as the production deadline for the last batch of Wii U consoles. However, the Japanese production line will take a few extra days before closing shop on November 4.

According to official statistics, Nintendo shipped 13.36 million Wii U consoles worldwide as of September 30. Adding the final shipments from October and November will only slightly improve the figure. We’re rounding it to 14 million Wii U consoles shipped worldwide for ease of use.

Wii U launched in November of 2012 and instantly moved a couple of million units. However, interest in the console soon waned. Lack of content support and communication from Nintendo forced consumers to look elsewhere for their gaming needs. The company completely dropped the ball with Wii U and it shows with its dismal sales figures. In comparison, the original Wii sold 101 million units in its lifetime while the Nintendo 64 moved 32 million units worldwide.

Initial Nintendo projections estimated the company to sell close to 100 million units worldwide. The forecast consistently diminished with the passing of each quarter, and even then the company failed to see any promising sales.

Closing down shop for Wii U was only logical seeing that the company’s new console, Nintendo Switch, is scheduled to launch in March 2017. If Wii U was faring any better in the market, Nintendo would have likely kept it alive. The crippled sales only mean a quick and dire end to the console.

An exclusive event planned for January promises to reveal more information about the company’s next platform, including games lineup and price. The only launch game confirmed for Switch at the moment is The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.

About Saqib Mansoor 406 Articles
The odd man in the group who hates chocolate, cheese, and having to work on Sundays.