YouTube Moves to Support HDR Content

YouTube is adding a new feature for its consumers to propel itself further as the largest video-sharing platform on the planet.

Earlier today, YouTube announced that it’s adding support for High Dynamic Range (HDR) to bring a more vibrant experience for its video content. This is exciting news for those who currently own HDR-enabled devices as they will now be able to watch YouTube videos in much better contrast. However, those without HDR-capable devices will continue to watch content in Standard Dynamic Range (SDR).

What devices can take advantage of this new feature? To begin with, PC systems linked to HDR-enabled monitors as well as the popular Chromecast Ultra. Every Samsung SUHD and UHD television models from 2016 also house HDR functionality.

There’s a fairly easy way to make sure you are HDR-compatible. Find any HDR-supporting content on YouTube and go through its settings. If it gives you the option between SDR and HDR then you’re ready. If not, you’ll only see the lonely SDR option.

To jump-start the feature, YouTube is partnering with a number of creators to produce HDR content. The California-based company has specifically noted that it does not want its consumers to jump through hoops for the feature. Hence, uploading HDR content is as simple as uploading any other video. There are no hindrances involved.

The HDR announcement comes at the heels of YouTube promising an HDR player for PlayStation 4. The application is yet to be released. However, in the light of today’s announcement as well as the fact that PlayStation 4 Pro is hitting the markets, a potential release for Sony’s console shouldn’t be that far ahead.

HDR is the new trend so to speak. A number of companies have already announced support for the video feature while others are working on it. Apple’s Final Cut Pro X, Adobe Premiere Pro and Avid all added support for HDR video formats in recent months.

About Saqib Mansoor 406 Articles
The odd man in the group who hates chocolate, cheese, and having to work on Sundays.