Apple Inc.’s (NASDAQ: AAPL) Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing, Phil Schiller, has confirmed to a group of reporters that Apple is finally thinking about its 2013 Mac Pro once again, and that a refresh is already in the pipeline.

Schiller, and Craig Federighi, were speaking to news outlets that included BuzzFeed, TechCrunch, and Daring Fireball, at the company’s Machine Shop hardware lab. Schiller made it clear that the company knew Mac Pro had been anything but a success, but Apple was looking forward and not backward, and a redesigned model would be launched soon.

Schiller stated that “We are completely rethinking the Mac Pro” and he also confirmed that a Mac Pro display is also in the works, stating “Since the Mac Pro is a modular system, we are also doing a pro display”. But where there is potential light at the end of the tunnel for users and fans of the series that have been left frustrated and exasperated with Apple’s lack to attention to its premium Mac machine, Schiller also made it clear that these new products won’t see the light of day anytime during this year.

When it was Federighi’s turn to speak, he said “designed ourselves into a corner”¬†admitting that the design and engineering teams at Apple threw themselves off a cliff themselves by going for a circular design. At the time of launch, Schiller proudly unveiled the top-tier Mac Pro with his infamous “Cant innovate anymore, my ass” quip but, while it looked impressive in design, it lacked in one major, major department: the ability to upgrade.

Mac Pro’s design left little to no room for the user to upgrade the internals, but, John Ternus, Apple VP of hardware engineering, offered a positive uptake on the matter when he said “It served its purpose well”¬†but that “it doesn’t have the flexibility”.

Well, now that they’ve understood and admitted that the only useful thing about the Mac Pro was its design, and confirmed that an improved version is on its way, however slowly, users can finally breathe a sigh of relief that Apple has not quite forgotten its crown-jewel Mac system.