It has been confirmed that cracking group CPY has managed to successfully break the anti-tamper technology of the latest version of Denuvo.

It was being said that the new version is far more resistant to piracy and an upgrade to the older versions used for Resident Evil 7 and Mass Effect: Andromeda, both of whom were cracked pretty easily. However, even the latest iteration didn’t fare any better.

The community is referring to it as version four of Denuvo, which started accompanying a number of games in the past couple of months. 2Dark, an indie stealth-adventure horror game, was one of them. Yesterday, CPY announced that it has broken past the walls of Denuvo v4.

To the credit of Denuvo’s makers, it took the cracking group a little over a month to crack the game. In comparison, Resident Evil 7, with the older version, was cracked within just five days of its release. Mass Effect: Andromeda, on the other hand, took ten days to be thrown on various file-sharing websites.

However, the fact remains that Denuvo v4 was supposed to withstand any pirating attempts. At least many were expecting the games to last more than a month. It is clear that cracking groups have finally figured out what makes the anti-tamper technology tick.

It is an endless cycle, with Denuvo being evolved each time to last longer, and crackers doing their job in as less time as possible. With the failure of Denuov v4, everyone is awaiting to hear about the successful cracking of other recent releases such as Nier Automata and Bulletstorm: Full Clip Edition.

Sooner or later, publishers must question whether it is of any use to continue employing the technology. A couple of months of safe release sounds doable. However, when games are being cracked within just weeks of release, there seems little point in paying for a technology like Denuvo.