iOS 11 is now less than a month away from launch, and rumors have started to gather pace and accumulate before the official announcement is made by Apple. Today, a screenshot of a post made on Reddit by user “cyanhat” is making the rounds, in which he hints at some upcoming features of iOS 11.

According to the post, mentioned at number two, is peer-to-peer payments on Apple Pay. It is a functionality that was initially rumored to be making its way to last year’s iOS 10, but it didn’t make it to the final release. iMessage was overhauled in last year’s update, and while more changes are expected to be made to the platform even this year, one of the major changes could be that users will be finally able to send each other money using iMessage and Apple Pay. Moreover, just transfer of funds is not the only functionality coming to Apple Pay as part of the iOS update, as a complete social element is also believed to be incorporated that will lend a similarity to Venmo.

Secondly, FaceTime group chats, as reported earlier, are also mentioned by in the post, that will allow the inclusion of up to five users in a video call. Video calling is an instrumental feature and a feather in the caps of all major instant messaging apps like Messenger, WhatsApp, Snapchat, Skype, etc. So far, it has eluded FaceTime, but that looks to be ending this summer, almost certainly.

By far, the most interesting feature mentioned in the post is that FaceTime Audio will become the default voice calling service for all iPhone to iPhone calls on iOS 11. It will, obviously, eat up its fair share of data, which should be around 1MB for 1 minute of FaceTime Audio call, but what it excels in is voice quality, and a much superior experience as compared to the standard, cellular voice calling.

Finally, a battery-saving mode has also been mentioned, but might not make the cut, is when the user leaves the home Wi-Fi network with less than 20 percent on the battery, the phone switches on Battery Saving mode on its own. Currently, the Low Power Mode is optional at 20 percent, but in iOS 11, it’ll turn on assuming you’ve left the charger at home and you can’t charge in your car, if you’re driving. While it seems handy, there’s no telling whether it’ll be included in the final release as its still up for debate.