Nintendo Switch units have been flying off shelves in the past couple of months, making it incredibly challenging for retailers to replenish their stocks. As is the current situation, most consumers have to wait weeks or even longer before they get the chance to get hold of the new hybrid console. This, of course, does not guarantee a purchase for everyone and there is a large horde of disappointed that is yet to get find the console available in local shops.

In the past, Nintendo has often been criticized to show slack when it comes to regularly supplying retailers. However, the Japanese company is pulling out all of the stops to ensure that it meets the high demand for its new console.

It has been confirmed that the company is sending out new batches of Nintendo Switch units to retailers by air.

“We carried some of the Switches by plane in March to serve our customers more promptly,” a spokesperson told The Wall Street Journal.

Nintendo usually ships hardware through freighters, which is cheaper but also slower. Flying in supplies means that Nintendo is willing to put up with the additional cost just to make sure that everyone gets a Nintendo Switch unit.

According to analyst Hideki Yasuda, “Air is a big profit-squeezer because it could cost additional ¥5,000 per unit.” It is important to note that the company originally planned to ship at least two million units at launch. However, it was able to pump a few extra units in the process, ending up with 2.74 million units in stores.

The launch figures were confirmed last week when Nintendo announced its financials. While it is commendable that the company managed to go past its original goal, it is still find it a challenge to make sure that every major retailer is fully stocked with the Switch at all times.

“It’s exceeding our expectations,” GameStop’s Senior Director of Merchandising, Eric Bright, told Forbes. “We knew it would be a high-demand product, but our Switch allocations are selling out not in days, but in hours…the demand is so high that consumers have to react quickly to be able to get their hands on them.”

An empty stock means disappointed consumers, which in turn hurts Nintendo. That being said, the craze for the console is not dying any time soon. Sales are expected to take a sharp increase in the coming months when new batches of units arrive.