Technology advances at the hands of user demand or at rival competition, the later maybe true, but Intel has stated recently that the 18-core Core i9 is not a competition response to 16-core AMD Ryzen Threadripper.

When AMD announced the Ryzen Threadripper processor, few days later at Computex event, Intel all of sudden announced its Core i9 processor. While this move may appear as a rivalry stunt, Intel’s Frank Soqui says that Intel is not reacting to the competition. He adds and explains his argument with the word mega-tasking as:

We were always planning that sort of trajectory, and there’s a reason why we do that. Have we explained mega-tasking to you?

Intel’s Frank Soqui explains the term Mega-tasking as a gigantic system-intensive workload designed specifically for different and complex multi tasking users. He further adds that Core i9 is in the response of the needs / demand of end user, not a competition.

Independent of what our competitors do we will put out extreme edition processors, We’ll push performance, we’ll push threads, we’ll push cores, we’re pushing memory performance. This is not a response to the competition, this is a response to the end user

Intel may push its innovation and technology to design Core i9, but the cost will always be a selling point. AMD Ryzen Threadripper is reportedly to cost much lower than Core i9, if Intel states the move not to be a competition, than the price point will eventually drag both products into competition.

Let us know what you think about the announcement of Intel Core i9 in the wake of AMD Ryzen Threadripper. Is Core i9 truly designed in response to user-end? Or is it really a competition reaction? Let us know in comments section below.